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Fall 2014 Classes

ENHANCED COURSES

An Enhanced Course is open to all UB students, but enrolled Denit Honors Program students are able to count the enhanced credits (with a minimum GPA of 3.3) earned toward their credit requirement for graduation with Denit honors. Enhanced courses offer opportunities for both students and professors to engage in challenging and fun learning experiences both in and out of the classroom.




Any student may enroll in an enhanced course without applying to the Denit Honors Program, but we do recommend submitting an application in case you decide to take more honors courses. Application deadlines are September 22nd for fall semester and February 6th for spring semester.

      • HIST 480.WEB Introduction to Public History

        A survey of the professional applications of historical analysis in settings outside academe focusing on the practice of history in museums, archives, historical societies and preservation. Guest speakers and site visits are featured. Francesca Gamber

      • HIST 497.002 Intensive exploration of Modern Korea

        This semester students will visit the State Department in Washington, D.C. as part of their course of study.
        W 2:00-4:30 Boram

      • PHIL 280.101 Environmental Ethics

        Explores the relationship between humans and the nonhuman environment and guides students in thinking more clearly, insightfully and effectively about that relationship. Students read a wide array of classic
        and contemporary texts from a variety of philosophic traditions, and they are sked to consider some of the most pressing ethical, political and legal issues concerning our treatment of the environment.
        W. 5:30-6:45 (hybrid) Darien Ripple

      • PHIL 419.001 Religions in America

         A study of the historical and theological developments in Protestantism, Catholicism and Judaism on the American continent, from the colonial period to the present, including a consideration of the ways in which American civilization modified European religious traditions and developed new sects, cults and religious traditions.
        TH 11:00-1:30 Steve Scalet

      • PSYC 260 Psych of Religion and Spirit

        An in-depth, research-based survey of the study of the origins, development and consequences of religion and spirituality from a psychological perspective. The relationship between religion and social-psychological variables in particular is investigated. Religious experiences from a variety of perspectives, including the objective, Freudian,
        Jungian and humanistic, are examined. The relationship between science and religion is also addressed.
        prerequisite: PSYC 100 or an equivalent introductory psychology course or permission of the program director.
        Tu 2:00-4:30 Kris Eyssell

      • COS 151.101 Computer Programming I 

        A first programming course designed to teach problem-solving, algorithm development and principles of good programming.Topics include procedures, decisions, repetition, arrays, sequential and random-access files and the graphical display of data. Algorithms are implemented in a visual programming language. Laboratory fee required.
        Prerequisite: None We: 8:15-10:45

      • ACCT 201. Introduction to Financial Accounting

        A comprehensive study of basic financial accounting processes applicable to a service, merchandising, and manufacturing business. An analysis of transactions, journalizing, posting, preparation of working papers and ­financial statements.
        MoWe: 11-12:20
        .

      •  ENTR 300.001 The Entrepreneurial Experience

        The entrepreneurial process considered as a paradigm, tracing the process and highlighting its practical applications. Special emphasis on the creation and initial growth phases of new ventures, with
        discussion of related ethical, international and legal issues. Local entrepreneurs serve as guest speakers. Open to all students, this course functions as a survey course as well as the first in the specialization in
        entrepreneurship sequence. There is a lab fee associated with this course.
        Mo: 2-4:30

      •  INSS 300. 102 Management Information Systems

        Provides a fundamental knowledge of information systems and technology (IS&T) issues from the perspective of business professionals. This includes information technology concepts and vocabulary as well as insights into IS&T applications in business organizations. Topics include searching and extracting information to solve business problems; the role of organizational context in IS&T effectiveness; the economic, social, legal and ethical impacts of IS&T; the systems life cycle approach; and key technologies such as the Internet, networking and database management systems. This course satisfies the University’s information literacy requirement in
        addition to the computer literacy general-education requirement. 

      • OPRE 315.002 Business Application and Decision Science

        A study of managerial decision-making processes using a decision-sciences approach. Topics include linear and integer models and decision analysis and their application in investment problems, media
        selection, market research, product mix, production planning, personnel scheduling and transportation design, among others. Special emphasis is on understanding the concepts and computer implementation and interpreting the results to write management reports. prerequisite:
        MATH 111 and OPRE 201 TuTh: 3:30-4:50

      •  MGMT 315.101 Human Resource Management

        An exploration of competence areas necessary for effectively dealing with people in the workplace. Emphasis is placed on practical application of knowledge gained in the areas of human resource planning, job analysis, selection, training, compensation and safety/health administration. An overview of labor-management relations is provided. Course coverage includes diversity, ethics, communication and international considerations.
        Th: 5:30-8

      •  MKTG 460.101 Advanced Marketing Management

        A study of the organization and management of a marketing-oriented enterprise using marketing cases and/or simulations to integrate the frameworks and skills from Marketing Management (MKTG 301) to analyze and plan marketing programs. Critical thinking, oral and written communication and teamwork competencies are advanced.
        Prerequisites: MKTG 301, senior status or permission of the department chair.
        Tu: 5:30-8

      • MGMT 302. 003 Global Business Environment

        This course enhances students' abilities to operate successfully in today's multicultural, global environment. Students will gain a theoretical basis for understanding key aspects of the global business environment, as applied to small companies, multinational corporations, multilateral institutions and non-governmental organizations. Students will explore the impacts of globalization at home and abroad. Course modules aim to broaden the students' understanding of similarities and differences among national political economics, legal systems and sociocultural environments, including world religions, business ethics and social responsiblity. Students will survey business functions as they are applied to expand and manage international operations.
        TuTh: 3:30-4:50

      • MGMT 315. Human Resource Management

        An exploration of competence areas necessary for effectively dealing with people in the workplace. Emphasis is placed on practical application of knowledge gained in the areas of human resource planning, job analysis, selection, training, compensation and safety/health administration. An overview of labor-management relations is provided. Course coverage includes diversity, ethics, communication and international considerations.
        TuTh: 12:30-1:45

HONORS COURSES
In order to enroll in an honors course, you must have an application on file (unless incoming pre-designated honors freshman enrolling in an honors learning community), have the required GPA, and contact your academic advisor or Kelly McPhee for permission.

        • IDIS 302.HN1 Ethics in Business and Society

          Provides a structured experience in which students from the School of Business and the College of Arts and Sciences explore together the interrelationships between business and various other sectors of
          society, e.g., the individual, government and international environment. Emphasis is placed on values and on the ethical issues implicit in those interrelationships.
          We: 5:30-8

        • ACCT 310.HN1 Intermediate Accounting III

          The third course in a three-course sequence for accounting majors. A comprehensive view of financial accounting concepts and principles, an intensive look at the nature and determination of the major financial statements, and an examination of current accounting practice, theory, and literature of computerized and non-computerized ­systems. Topics include income taxes, pensions and post-retirement benefits, leases, accounting changes, error analysis and statement of cash flows. Prerequisite: ACCT 302 or equivalent with a minimum grade of B-.
          TuTh:12:30-1:50

HONORS FOR FRESHMEN

If you have been pre-selected as Honors Eligible, please contact your advisor to enroll.

    • Learning Community 1: Speaking & Writing Under the City Lights

      WRIT 215 ntroduction to Creative Writing TuTh: 11-12:20
      Introduces students to the creative process and craft of writing poetry and fiction by exploring the elements and techniques of those genres. Students write and share poems and short fiction in a workshop setting.
      CMAT 201

      Communicating Effectively TuTh: 2-3:20
      Introduction to oral communication: interpersonal, small group and public speaking. Emphasis on accurately transmitting information, using effective strategies for informing and persuading, using effective communication techniques to work with others, and feeling at ease in front of an audience. Laboratory fee required.
    • Learning Community 2: Urban Solutions: Contemporary Issues in Historical Context

      IDIS 101 First Year Seminar MoWe: 9:30-10:50
      Helps students to develop key skills, knowledge and habits of mind necessary for academic and professional success. In an active-learning environment, first-semester students and their instructors explore the nature and practice of intellectual inquiry in a university environment. Applied exercises reinforce core study/learning skills in the context of real-time demands, while structured self- and group reflection develops concurrent skills in personal, academic and professional goal-setting. Students become more intentional, lifelong learners, with skills in teamwork and critical thinking that can become fundamental elements of personal effectiveness in increasingly complex and globalized communities and work environments.

      CSCE 100 Urban Solutions MoWe: 11-12:20
      Provides an introduction to the field of urban studies and to the practices of studying cities and metropolitan areas. Students are exposed to a variety of current and historic urban challenges as well as policy solutions. The course exposes students to the complexity of life in metropolitan regions, using the Baltimore area and other cities nationally and internationally as case studies.

      HIST 290 Great Topics in History: Urbanization MoWe: 2-3:20
      Focusing on a single topic or theme of historical and contemporary interest, this course emphasizes the roots of great issues in history. The course focuses on understanding and applying historical methods, analyzing issues in their broader historical context and analyzing a variety of historical sources. The topic for a given semester appears in the schedule of classes.
    • Learning Community 3: Crab Cakes & Pit Beef: Baltimore's Food Ecology

      ENVS 201 Human Ecology  MoWe: 11-12:20
      Introduces the student to aspects and dimensions of the impact of burgeoning human populations on human societies and life on Earth in general. Specific applied topics in environmental science, ecology and sustainability are covered, with a focus on urban ecosystem issues. An emphasis is placed on current and newsworthy topics at scales ranging from local to global. Understanding the place of humans in the biosphere and how to ensure a habitable planet for future generations and for other organisms is a primary goal of the course.

      INFO 110 Information Literacy MoWe: 2-3:20
      Being able to find, assess and use information effectively is a fundamental skill needed in any career as well as in day-to-day life. This course teaches students how to define their information needs, search for information effectively, make logical arguments, understand the different forms information can take, critically assess information they find and present data in an appropriate way. In addition, it provides students with the skills necessary to evaluate the kinds of opinion and argumentation they encounter outside the University.
      IDIS 101

      First Year Seminar
      TuTh: 2-3:20
      Helps students to develop key skills, knowledge and habits of mind necessary for academic and professional success. In an active-learning environment, first-semester students and their instructors explore the nature and practice of intellectual inquiry in a university environment. Applied exercises reinforce core study/learning skills in the context of real-time demands, while structured self- and group reflection develops concurrent skills in personal, academic and professional goal-setting. Students become more intentional, lifelong learners, with skills in teamwork and critical thinking that can become fundamental elements of personal effectiveness in increasingly complex and globalized communities and work environments.

      IDIS 101 First Year Seminar MoWe: 3:30-4:50