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Student Handbook

The University of Baltimore's educational mission - one joining access and excellence - can succeed only within a framework of fair treatment, interpersonal respect and appropriate behavior. This framework makes it possible for members of the community to teach, learn freely and prevents community members from interfering with each other's strides toward learning and success, whether that interference appears as behavior disruptive of a classroom, unfair or arbitrary grading, or submission of work that does not fairly represent a community member's own intellectual effort.

These policies and procedures:

  • provide and clarify those standards of behavior by and toward students that are necessary to support the university's educational mission, and
  • provide processes for addressing failures to meet those standards.

The policies and procedures in this handbook apply to all students of the university unless the language of the handbook specifically indicates otherwise.

The University of Baltimore publishes this handbook annually, but the policies and procedures may be subject to change during the academic year. For additional information regarding any policies or procedures included in this handbook, contact the Office of Community Life and the Dean of Students.

Academic Integrity Policy (Yale Gordon College of Arts and Sciences, the Merrick School of Business, and the College of Public Affairs)

The University of Baltimore comprises a community of students, faculty, administrators, and staff who share a commitment to learning. As the practice of academic honesty is essential to learning, the university has established the following policy for academic honesty. The university's academic integrity policy is derived from the following convictions:

  • Honesty is the foundation of personal integrity
  • Honesty promotes substantive learning
  • Honesty validates the recognition of scholarly achievement
  • Honesty demonstrates respect for the work of others, enabling effective cooperation

All members of our community share responsibility for actively fostering academic honesty, actively discouraging academic dishonesty, and engaging in ongoing discussion of activities that may violate the spirit of honesty.

Although the academic integrity policy places primary emphasis on fostering honesty, it also provides clear consequences for behavior that violates the policy, together with fair procedures for judging alleged cases of dishonesty.

  • Policy Statement

    It is the policy of the University of Baltimore:

    • that the academic performance of each member of the University community should fairly reflect that person's own capabilities and efforts
    • that prohibited actions include cheating, plagiarism, falsification, submission of the same work in different courses, and any attempts to facilitate these activities
    • that members of the University of Baltimore community will not condone actual or attempted cheating, plagiarism, falsification or other academically dishonest activities
    • that members of the community will take appropriate actions to report and resolve any suspected violations of the principle of academic honesty following the procedures established in the appropriate University of Baltimore policies

      All members of the University community (students, faculty, administration, and staff) must take academic honesty seriously by being well informed, by contributing to a climate in which honesty is valued, and by taking responsible action to discourage dishonesty in the work of others. No member will condone or tolerate cheating, plagiarism, falsification, or other acts of academic dishonesty, as these negativley affect the community and all its members

  • Community Responsibilities

    Responsibilities of Students

    University of Baltimore Students will:

    • encourage and support an atmosphere of academic honesty
    • utilize appropriate methods of documenting the sources used in their written work
    • refrain from acts of cheating, plagiarism, or other violations of the academic integrity policy and make all reasonable efforts to prevent the occurrence of academic dishonesty
    • refrain from assisting other students in any attempts to violate the academic integrity policy
    • report acts of academic dishonesty of which they are aware to the responsible faculty member or to the dean of students
    • take the university's on-line course in academic integrity prior to the completion of their first semester at UB in order to ensure that their understanding of academic integrity requirements is complete and consistent with the requirements of the university
    • consult the dean of students or personnel at the Achievement and Learning Center if they have any questions about this policy or about what constitutes academic dishonesty

    Responsibilities of Faculty

    University of Baltimore faculty members will:

    • encourage and support an atmosphere of academic honesty
    • take appropriate measures to raise the consciousness of individuals throughout the university community to the importance of maintaining the values underlying academic honesty
    • serve as models of academic honesty
    • emphasize the need for appropriate source attribution in written work
    • emphasize the need for academic honesty in their syllabi
    • indicate in their syllabi if they intend to punish incidents of academic dishonesty through the use of sanctions more severe than awarding of no credit (a grade of 0) for the project or work involved (for example, if their policy will be to assign a failing grade in the course for any violation of the academic integrity policy)
    • clearly inform their classes of the extent to which collaboration and use of outside sources (such as use of texts or notes during examinations or take-home work) are permitted in their tests and assignments
    • appropriately safeguard course material and examinations to prevent the occurrence of academic dishonesty through their inappropriate dissemination
    • take appropriate action when instances of academic dishonesty are suspected
    • consult the dean of students for further information about or clarification of the policy or the procedures relating to academic integrity
    • keep academic integrity inquiries and investigations about particular students confidential, aside from discussions with the student, discussions with the dean of students, and discussions with the relevant faculty administrators, during which the faculty member should not reveal the student's name unless a final determination has been made

    Responsibilities of Administrators and Staff

    University of Baltimore administrators and staff will:

    • encourage and support an atmosphere of academic honesty
    • take appropriate measures to raise the consciousness of individuals throughout the university community to the importance of maintaining the values underlying academic honesty
    • encourage discussion of issues involving the principles of integrity and honesty at all levels of the university community
    • take steps to define acts of academic dishonesty, ensure procedures for due process for persons accused or suspected of acts of academic dishonesty, and impose appropriate sanctions on members of the university community found to have been guilty of acts of academic dishonesty
    • provide advice about this policy and about what constitutes academic integrity through the dean of students and personnel at the Achievement and Learning Center
    • serve as models of academic honesty
  • Definitions of Academic Dishonesty

    The following are descriptions and examples of behaviors that are inconsistent with the university academic integrity policy:

    Cheating

    Cheating includes the giving or receiving of any unauthorized assistance or providing or obtaining unfair advantage in any form of academic work. Examples may include, but are not limited to, the use during exams of crib sheets or any other materials not expressly authorized by the professor, unauthorized possession of a test prior to the test date, copying from other students' exams, or talking to other students during exams.

    Examples for faculty, administrators, and staff include, but are not limited to, providing an individual student with exam answers in advance or otherwise giving a student an unfair advantage over other students during an exam.

    Plagiarism

    Plagiarism includes the copying of the language, structure, ideas, or thoughts of another and representing the same as one's own original work. Examples may include, but are not limited to, submission of a purchased research paper as one's own work, paraphrasing and/or quoting material in a paper without properly documenting the source, and copying someone else's language without using quotation marks and/or crediting the original author.

    Examples for faculty, administrators, and staff include, but are not limited to, failing to acknowledge the work of another in publications or publishing a student's work as one's own.

    Multiple submissions of the same work

    It is a violation of the academic integrity policy to submit work that was prepared for one course for credit in another or to submit the same work for credit in two courses, without permission from the responsible professor(s).

    Falsification

    Falsification includes the statement of any untruth either verbally or in writing with respect to any circumstances relating to one's academic work. Examples may include, but are not limited to, receiving assistance or working as a group on an independent take-home examination, making false statements to avoid taking an examination, engaging in any other type of activity that gives an unfair advantage to an individual student over other students, or providing inaccurate information concerning one's academic standing or status to anyone, inside or outside the university. Knowingly making a false report that another student has violated the academic integrity policy also constitutes falsification.

    Examples for faculty, administrators, and staff include, but are not limited to, knowingly falsifying data, misrepresenting information on a resume, or misleading students in terms of compensation or scholarship that they will receive for student assistant work.

    Attempts/Facilitation

    Any attempts toward or facilitation of any act of academic dishonesty are also cases of academic dishonesty. Examples may include, but are not limited to, knowingly discussing a test or an examination not yet taken with another student who has taken that test or examination, or knowingly discussing an examination already taken with another student who is scheduled to take that examination, but has not yet done so.

    Examples for faculty, administrators, and staff include, but are not limited to, facilitating a student's efforts to cheat on an examination, facilitating another in an act of plagiarism, or facilitating the falsification of data or other information.

  • Reporting Violations

    Those within the university community shall not condone academic dishonesty because this activity negatively affects the community as a whole and each of its members. In order to encourage a climate of academic honesty, community members will therefore discourage dishonest behavior if they hear of it in general terms and, if aware of more specific behavior that is a probable violation of the academic integrity policy, will report their concerns to the professor in whose class the behavior occurred, the dean of students, the dean of each school or college, or the provost.

    Any person who knows of or has good reason to suspect a violation of the University of Baltimore academic integrity policy by a student or students should notify the faculty member for the class in which the potential violation occurred or the dean of students, who will in turn notify the relevant faculty member.

    A faculty member who receives notice, otherwise becomes aware of, or has good reason to suspect that a student in that faculty member's class has violated the academic integrity policy will attempt to contact the student within the following 14 calendar days. The purpose of the contact is to discuss the academic integrity allegations with the student and to hear the student's response. As background for this discussion, the faculty member will refer the student to the sections of the Student Policies and Procedures Handbook relating to academic integrity matters. The discussion may take place in person, by telephone, or by e-mail.

    If the faculty member attempts to contact a student to discuss academic integrity concerns and the student (1) fails to respond to the faculty member's attempted contact for a period of 14 calendar days after that contact occurs, (2) declines to participate in discussion with the faculty member, or (3) agrees to participate in the discussion, but subsequently fails to do so, the faculty member will refer the matter to the dean of students.

    In light of the student/faculty discussion:

    (1) If the faculty member determines that the academic integrity policy has not been violated, the matter will be closed and the work in question graded as if no academic integrity question had been raised.

    (2) If the faculty member believes that the academic integrity policy may have been violated, he or she will either resolve the matter with the student and will send a sealed letter to the dean of students as described in (a) below or will refer the matter directly to the dean of students to follow one of the processes described in (b) below:

    (a) Resolution through discussion. During the initial discussion or a subsequent discussion, if necessary, the faculty member may determine whether the student is willing to accept responsibility for the actions in question. If the student is willing to accept responsibility, the faculty member will propose a penalty the faculty member considers appropriate in light of the violation and the acceptance of responsibility. If the student is willing to accept that penalty, the student and faculty member will sign a statement reflecting their agreement and the student's acceptance of responsibility. The faculty member will place a copy of the statement in an envelope, seal it, and write on the envelope's exterior the name of the student, the faculty member, the course, and semester in which the course was taken. The faculty member will then forward the sealed envelope to the dean of students. If the dean of students has no previous envelope bearing the student's name and the student has not previously been found to have violated the university's academic integrity policy, the sealed envelope will be placed on file. If an envelope represents a second allegation of academic integrity violations, the dean of students will convene a hearing board to adjudicate the second alleged violation.

    When a student graduates or after the time allowed for the completion of a program, the dean of students will destroy any sealed envelopes bearing that student's name.

    (b) Referral to dean of students. If the faculty member does not wish to resolve the matter through discussion or if an attempted resolution is not successful, the faculty member will submit the allegations to the dean of students. The dean of students may consider the matter administratively or submit it for a disciplinary hearing before a Hearing Board.

    (i) Administrative consideration. The dean of students or their designee may consider the case administratively if the student and faculty member did not reach an agreement on a penalty under provision (a) above. The minimum sanction that will be imposed by the dean of students through administrative consideration will be no credit (a grade of 0) for the project or work in question. If, however, the syllabus for the relevant course states that an academic integrity violation will result in a more stringent sanction than no credit for the work (for example, if it states that any academic integrity violation will result in a failure of the course), the minimum sanction that will be imposed through administrative consideration will be the sanction provided in the syllabus.

    (ii) Hearing board. Unless the case is considered administratively as described above, the case will be submitted to a disciplinary hearing before a hearing board. The hearing board will follow the procedures provided in the Disciplinary Procedures portion of this Handbook.

    If grades must be submitted for any student before an academic integrity allegation regarding him or her has been resolved, the faculty member will submit a temporary grade of "TG" for that student. Upon completion of an academic integrity inquiry, the temporary ("TG") grade will be removed and changed to the grade determined to be appropriate as a result of that inquiry.

  • Potential Sanctions

    Sanctions for the violation of the University of Baltimore academic integrity policy may include one or more of the following:

    Non-credit for Work

    A judgment that specific work violated the academic integrity policy can result in the student receiving no credit (a grade of 0) for that work, with a consequent grade in accordance with the grading policy indicated in the course syllabus.

    Failure of the Course

    A judgment that work or behavior has violated the academic integrity policy can result in failure of the relevant course. The failure of a course for academic integrity reasons will be reflected in a grade of "FX." If the student successfully completes an academic integrity course administered by the dean of students, the grade of "FX" will be changed to a grade of "F."

    Integrity Paper

    The writing of a research paper may be required in an attempt to educate students about the principles of honesty and integrity.

    Disciplinary Probation

    Disciplinary probation may be assigned for a specific period of time during which a student may not represent the university in any capacity nor hold office in student government or any other student organization.

    Disciplinary Suspension

    Disciplinary suspension precludes a student from registration, class attendance, and use of university facilities for at least one semester but not more than one year. Disciplinary suspension is recorded for the term of suspension in the student's academic record and removed from the record on completion of the suspension. Credits for any course completed during suspension are not acceptable as transfer credits at the University of Baltimore.

    Disciplinary Dismissal

    Disciplinary dismissal is cancellation of the student's registration and all permissions and privileges related thereto. Dismissal is permanently recorded in the student's academic record. A student who has been dismissed is not eligible for re-admission earlier than one year following dismissal and then only with the approval of the appropriate academic dean. Credits for any course completed during dismissal are not acceptable as transfer credits at the University of Baltimore.

    Disciplinary Expulsion

    Disciplinary expulsion is permanent dismissal from the university and cancellation of all permissions and privileges related thereto. Expulsion is permanently recorded in the student's academic record.

    When a hearing board finds that a student has violated the academic integrity policy, it will impose an appropriate sanction on the student. The minimum sanction for a first violation in the policy is no credit (a grade of 0) for the project or work in question. If, however, the syllabus for the relevant course states that an academic integrity violation will result in a more stringent sanction than no credit for the project of work in question (for example, if it states that any academic integrity violation will result in an FX for the course), the minimum sanction that will be imposed by a hearing board will be the sanction provided in the syllabus. The recommended minimum sanction for a second violation of the policy is expulsion from the university.

  • Faculty Procedures

    When a faculty member knows of or has good reason to suspect a violation of the University of Baltimore Academic Integrity Policy on the part of a student or students, the faculty members shall notify the student or students of his or her view and the reasons therefore.

    The faculty member shall determine an appropriate course of action after meeting with the student(s) to discuss the factors involved. At this time the faculty member shall inform the student of the sections of the Student Policies and Procedures Handbook which identify the university's Academic Integrity Policy.

    1. At the subsequent meeting if the faculty member determines that the case should be submitted for a disciplinary hearing, the faculty member shall so inform the student or students.

    2. At the subsequent meeting if the faculty member determines that no such hearing is needed, the faculty member shall make clear an intention to omit credit for the questionable work, and the consequences for determination of a final grade. The effect of omission on the final grade shall be in accordance with the course syllabus.

    If the student or students agree with the allegations, the student or students and the faculty member shall sign a statement of agreement. A copy of that statement, with the name of the student or students and the faculty member on the outside of an envelope, will be forwarded to the dean of students. That envelope shall remain sealed unless a second envelope with the student's name is received by the dean of students. In such an event the dean of students shall convene a hearing board. Sealed envelopes shall be destroyed after the student or students graduate, or after the time allowed for the completion of a program.

    If the student or students do not agree with the allegations, the faculty member shall either grade the questionable work as if the work were unquestionable, or shall submit the case to the second stage for a disciplinary hearing in accordance with the Procedures for Hearing Boards set forth in the Student Policies and Procedures Handbook.

    If the students refuses or fails to meet, or fails to respond, within 10 working days to a faculty member's request to meeting, the faculty member shall submit the case to the dean of students, who will convene a hearing board to adjudicate the case.

School of Law Honor Code

The School of Law Honor Code is available in it's entirety here.

Code of Conduct

Students are expected to maintain a high standard of conduct. Since the University’s role is to provide the best possible atmosphere for learning, individuals who violate its rules or regulations are subject to discipline. To the extent described below, the president of the University delegates authority over student discipline to the provost and the dean of students.

The code of conduct applies to all undergraduate, graduate, and professional students of the University and to all persons who are registered or enrolled in any credit or non-credit course or program offered by the University. No student may withdraw from a course while allegations of misconduct are being investigated and adjudicated. The code of conduct applies to acts of misconduct by students whether committed on- or off-campus.

All violations of the code of conduct will be adjudicated either by the dean of students, their designee or by a hearing board. If a violation might result in a student’s dismissal from the University or expulsion for disciplinary reasons, that violation shall be adjudicated by a hearing board. If not, the violation may be adjudicated in a disciplinary conference, as described below.

The code of conduct applies to acts of misconduct by students engaged in University-organized activities, whether committed on- or off-campus. A “University-organized activity” is any activity conducted under the sponsorship or supervision of the University or of registered student groups.

  • Code of Conduct violations

    Non-Academic Misconduct

    1. Violation of local, state, or federal law or of University regulations

    2. Use, possession, or carrying of weapons while on University premises or off-campus during a University- organized activity, except by authorized law enforcement officers or by other persons specifically authorized by the University to use, possess, or carry weapons

    3. Use, possession, distribution, or being under the influence of controlled substances or illegal drugs on University premises or off-campus during University-organized activities, except as permitted by law

    4. Rioting, assault, theft, vandalism, arson or breach of the peace on campus or related to University-organized activities

    5. Intentionally or recklessly interfering with normal University activities on University premises or University-organized activities. These activities include, but are not limited to, studying, teaching, research, University administration, or fire, police, or emergency services

    6. Unauthorized entry into or use of University facilities or equipment

    7. Forgery, alteration, destruction, or misuse of University documents, records, identification cards, or papers

    8. Furnishing false information to the University or other similar forms of dishonesty in University-regulated affairs, including knowingly making false oral or written statements to any University disciplinary authority

    9. Failure to comply with reasonable directions of or refusal to present identification to University officials acting in the performance of their duties, or refusal to comply with their requests to report to an administrative office

    10. Knowingly violating the terms of any disciplinary sanctions imposed in accordance with this code

    11. Theft or attempted theft of property or services; possession of stolen property

    12. Damage to University-owned or -controlled property or to that of any of its members or visitors

    13. Intentionally and substantially interfering with the freedom of expression of others

    14. Intentionally initiating or causing to be initiated any false report, warning or threat of fire, explosion or other emergency on University premises or at University-organized activities

    15. Physical abuse of any person or conduct that threatens or endangers the safety of others on University premises or at University-organized activities, including rape and sexual assault

    16. Hazing, defined as any action taken or situation created by students within a University group or organization that intentionally produces mental or physical discomfort, embarrassment, harassment, or ridicule for other students seeking to join or maintain membership in that group or organization

    17. Threatening, harassing, or abusive communications, by telephone, mail, or otherwise, directed at any member of the University community or a member’s family

    18. Lewd or disruptive behavior, indecent or obscene conduct on University premises or at University-organized activities

    19. Use of cellular phones, pagers, and other electronic devices in a manner that causes disruption in the classroom, library, or within any University facility

    20. Use of electronic devices, including cellular devices with photographic capabilities, for purposes of photographing test questions, notes, or other materials for uses that violate the University’s academic integrity policy or the law school’s honor code

    21. Use of any device to photograph individuals in areas of the University in which they have a reasonable expectation of privacy (for example, bathrooms and locker rooms), to photograph any person on University property or at a University-organized activity against his or her will, or to transmit photographs electronically without the subject’s permission.

    Computer Misconduct

    The following acts will be considered computer misconduct if they involve the use of University-owned computer equipment, facilities, hardware, or software (including the University computer network) or the use of private computer equipment on campus or during organized activities of the University or of registered student groups.

    1. vandalism, including physical abuse of hardware and knowingly compromising software or data

    2. theft of hardware, software, or data

    3. theft of computer time, including but not limited to using an account other than one’s own or use of a computer for profit

    4. abuse in which a computer is used as a tool, including but not limited to consumer fraud, computer dating services, spam, launch of viruses, use of University email to threaten or intimidate any person or organization, or unauthorized accessing of other systems

    5. unauthorized use or possession of hardware, software, or data

    6. unauthorized access to information resources, hardware, software, data, or facilities in violation of any restriction or published guidelines on usage

    7. unauthorized alterations of software, programs or data, including but not limited to using the computer to create false records, to alter authentic records, or to reproduce confidential data

    8. intentional corruption, misuse, or stealing of software or data, including but not limited to the unauthorized copying of copyrighted programs or any other computing resource

    9. use of UB computing resources for personal or private financial gain without written authorization from the provost

    10. establishing an independent computer system that has not been authorized, including plugging personal computers into the University network without authorization from the chief information officer

    11. knowingly executing a program that may hamper normal computing activities at the University or elsewhere, without written authorization from the chief information officer

    12. retrieving or downloading images or information that promote conduct otherwise prohibited by any section of the Student Policies and Procedures Handbook

    13. violating the University’s Academic Computer Center’s or the University System of Maryland’s regulations with regard to computer usage

    Disruptive Classroom Behavior

    The following procedures apply to situations where a student’s behavior is unduly disruptive to the classroom learning environment, as determined by the faculty member in the classroom. The dean of students or their designee may impose an Administrative Withdrawal (“WA") grade after using the following procedures:

    1. the instructor shall inform the student in an individual conference that his or her behavior is disruptive to the classroom learning environment. The instructor shall also notify the student that if the behavior does not cease, the instructor will request that the student be administratively withdrawn from the class

    2. if the student’s behavior does not improve, the instructor shall request in writing that the student be administratively withdrawn from the class. The instructor shall provide the Dean of Students with a written summary of the instructor’s conference with the student

    3.The dean of students shall investigate the charges and meet jointly with the instructor and student to discuss the request as soon as possible, but in no event more than 14 calendar days after the request

    5. if the student and professor are unable to reach an agreement during the discussions that occur  and the dean of students finds the charges to be substantiated, he/she shall forward the instructor’s request for administrative withdrawal to the registrar for action

    6. if, at any point in this process, the student’s behavior poses an immediate threat of disruption to or interference with the normal conduct of the University or threatens the safety of the students or others at the University, the dean of students may impose an interim suspension as described in these Student Policies and Procedures.

  • Sanctions That May Be Imposed for Code of Conduct Violations

    Non-Academic Misconduct

    In cases involving violations of the Code of Conduct, one or more sanctions shall be imposed for each violation by a hearing board or by the associate vice president for academic affairs, as appropriate. Sanctions shall be commensurate with the seriousness of the offense and repeated violations will justify increasingly severe sanctions. Any sanction imposed will be recorded in the confidential disciplinary records of the dean of students.

    Under the policies of the University System of Maryland, the appropriate sanction is presumed to be dismissal if a student has been convicted in a state or federal court or found responsible in a campus proceeding of rioting, assault, theft, vandalism, or breach of the peace related directly or indirectly to University-sponsored activities. If the appropriate person or board decides to impose a sanction less than suspension or expulsion for these violations, the decision must be supported by written findings, signed by the University’s chief student affairs officer, and maintained with the student’s disciplinary file.

    The following sanctions may be imposed for code of conduct violations.

    1. Disciplinary Reprimand

    A disciplinary reprimand is a written warning to the student that further misconduct may result in more disciplinary action.

    2. Loss of Privilege

    Loss of privilege is withdrawal of University privilege(s) or the right to use University service(s) or being barred from the University premises for a period of time.

    3. Restitution

    Restitution requires a student to pay for damages to or for misappropriation of property. Any student who knowingly damages or causes damage to occur to University property or that of its community members shall be required to pay full restitution within a specified period of time.

    4. Disciplinary Probation

    Disciplinary probation is assigned for a specific period of time, during which a student must not violate the University’s code of conduct. While on probation, a student shall not represent the University in any capacity nor hold office in student government or any other student organization.

    5. Administrative Withdrawal

    Administrative withdrawal is the withdrawal of a student from one or more courses at the University for the current semester. The student may be considered for readmission in subsequent semesters in compliance with the academic admission standards then in effect.

    6. Disciplinary Suspension

    Disciplinary suspension precludes a student from registration, class attendance, and use of University facilities for at least one semester but not more than one year. Disciplinary suspension is recorded for the term of the suspension in the student's academic record. Upon termination of the suspension, the record of the suspension will be removed from the student’s file and the student shall be considered for readmission in compliance with the academic admission standards then in effect, subject to review by the appropriate academic dean. Credits for any course completed during a suspension are not acceptable transfer credits at the University of Baltimore.

    7. Disciplinary Dismissal

    Dismissal is cancellation of the student's registration and all permissions and privileges related thereto. Dismissal is permanently recorded in the student's academic record. A student who has been dismissed is not eligible for readmission earlier than one year following dismissal and then only with the approval of the president. Credits for any course completed during a period of dismissal are not acceptable as transfer credits at the University of Baltimore.

    8. Disciplinary Expulsion

    Expulsion is the permanent dismissal of the student by the president of the University from registration, class attendance, and the use of University facilities. Expulsion is permanently recorded on the student's academic record.

    9. Interim Suspension

    An interim suspension requires that a student immediately leave the campus. It may be imposed upon the student for a period of not more than 30 days by the associate vice president for student affairs, with concurrence of the president. An interim suspension may be imposed when the associate vice president has reason to believe that:

    a. the safety and well-being of students, faculty or University property are in jeopardy; or

    b. the student's own physical or emotional safety is in jeopardy; or

    c. the student poses an immediate threat of disruption to or interference with the normal conduct of the University.

    In enforcing this sanction, the associate vice president for student affairs may rely upon information supplied by others. If any student returns to campus during this interim suspension without written permission from the associate vice president for student affairs, aside from returning solely to attend a disciplinary hearing, the student will be subject to disciplinary dismissal or disciplinary expulsion.

    10. Presidential Powers

    In the event of a mass disruption of the University by a group of students, the president may suspend the hearing board procedures and impose interim suspension(s) immediately. The president may then appoint a magistrate who is not part of the University community and who is qualified in the president’s judgment to hear all cases. The magistrate has full power to impose all University sanctions.

    11. Other Sanctions

    Other sanctions such as delay of graduation, community service, educational requirements, seminar attendance and research paper assignments may be imposed when deemed appropriate. 

Disciplinary Procedures

  • Disciplinary Conferences

    Students accused of code of conduct or academic integrity policy violations that will not result in  dismissal or expulsion from the University for disciplinary reasons, as determined by the dean of students or their designee, will attend a disciplinary conference. Such students are accorded the following procedural protections:

    1. Written notice of charges at least three calendar days prior to the scheduled conference.

    2. Reasonable access to the case file prior to the scheduled conference.

    3. An opportunity to respond to the evidence against them and to call appropriate witnesses in their behalf.

    At the close of the disciplinary conference, the dean of students will render a decision and, if appropriate, a sanction(s) to be imposed for the alleged violation(s).

  • Hearing Boards

    All students charged with violations of the code of conduct or academic integrity policy have a right to a hearing before a hearing board. Each board has jurisdiction over cases of alleged misconduct referred to it by the dean of students or their designee. The hearing boards will operate under the operational procedures provided in these policies and procedures and will provide a just and fair deliberation. The decisions of hearing boards are also subject to review and appeal as provided in these policies and procedures.

  • Operational Procedures of Hearing Boards

    A. Board Members

    1. The undergraduate hearing board shall consist of two undergraduate students, two faculty members, and one administrator.

    2. The graduate hearing board shall consist of two graduate students, two faculty members, and one administrator.

    3. The undergraduate and graduate hearing boards will have equal representation of the Yale Gordon College of Liberal Arts, the Merrick School of Business, and the College of Public Affairs among their student and faculty members, to the extent possible.

    4. The School of Law hearing board shall consist of two law students, two law faculty members, and one administrator.

    5. Student members of hearing boards shall be selected by the dean of students from annual appointees designated by the executive boards of the four branches of student government.

    6. Faculty members of hearing boards shall be selected by the dean of students from annual appointees of the deans.

    7. Administrators for hearing boards shall be selected from annual nominees and applicants.

    8. The senior faculty member on each hearing board shall serve as chair.

    9. The term of office of hearing board members shall be one calendar year. Vacancies may be filled any time.

    10. A quorum of a hearing board shall consist of four of the members assigned to the hearing board.

    B. Specifications of Fairness in Student Disciplinary Hearings

    Students have the following rights in situations in which they are charged with conduct that will result in a disciplinary hearing:

    1. The right to a written notice of charges and a list of hearing board members and witnesses at least 14 calendar days prior to a scheduled hearing. (The University must make a reasonable effort to deliver such notice. The charged student cannot frustrate this process by moving or failing to accept mail.)

    2. The right to a fair and impartial hearing before a hearing board.

    3. An opportunity to review, in advance, written information to be submitted at a hearing.

    4. The right to have an outside attorney present if the student is facing or there is reason to believe the student may face criminal and University charges stemming from the same incident.

    5. The right to present a version of the facts through personal and written statements, including the statements of witnesses.

    6. The opportunity to hear all information against him/her, and to question witnesses personally (not through counsel).

    7. The right to a determination of the facts of the case based solely on information presented at the hearing.

    8. The right to a written statement of the findings of fact.

    9. The right to make a record of the hearing at his or her own expense.

    10. The right to confidentiality of the hearing proceedings. Neither board members nor the dean of students will discuss or reveal to those who were not present what happened during the hearing, except that (i) they communicate results to University officials as necessary to implement the decisions of the hearing board and they will inform the victims of the outcome of a hearing in which they alleged sexual assault.

    11. A student who wishes to have persons present at the hearing other than those whose presence is required under these procedures must provide a written statement to the dean of students that waives the confidentiality of the proceeding with regard to the additional attendees.

    C. Procedures for Hearing Boards

    1. When the accused student requests to have additional persons present at the hearing and has waived the right to confidentiality with regard to those persons, the chair of the hearing board shall permit a limited number of those persons to attend the hearing. Under no circumstances will the hearing be open to more people than appropriate in light of the normal capacity of the hearing room. In addition, in the event of a hearing involving allegations of sexual assault, the alleged victim is entitled to the same opportunities to have others present when he or she is present at the hearing as the accused student.

    2. The accused student may challenge up to two members of the board peremptorily and without cause. The dean of students or their designee will designate alternate members of the board to replace those challenged.

    3. The accused student may be represented or assisted by any member of the academic community of the University of Baltimore, except those members who are attorneys. No person representing or assisting a student may accept a fee for the service. He or she may speak to and advise the student, but may not take part in any of the proceedings or address the hearing board. The chair of the hearings board may ask the representative to leave the hearing if these rules are violated in any way.

    4. The accused student may not be represented by legal counsel unless criminal charges stemming from the same incident exist or there is reason to believe that they may be brought. In those cases, the accused student may have an attorney present, but the following procedures apply:

    (1) The chair will inform counsel that he/she is present only to safeguard the defendant’s rights in the criminal proceeding, not to affect the outcome of the disciplinary hearing. Counsel’s principal functions are to advise the accused student whether to answer questions and what to say in order to avoid self-incrimination. Counsel therefore may speak to and advise the student, but may not take part in any of the proceedings. Counsel may not address the hearing board.

    (2) An accused student who intends to bring an attorney to a hearing must notify the Office of Community Life and the Dean of Students in writing, four working days prior to the hearing date so that a representative of the state’s attorney general can be present.

    (3) The chair of the hearing board may ask an accused student’s attorney to leave the hearing if these rules are violated in any way.

    5. The chair of each hearing board will exercise control over the hearing to avoid needless consumption of time and to prevent the harassment or intimidation of witnesses.

    6. Prospective witnesses, other than the complainant and the charged student, may be excluded during the testimony of other witnesses, at the option of the hearing board. All parties, the witnesses, and the public shall be excluded during board deliberations.

    7. Formal rules of evidence are not applicable in disciplinary proceedings under these procedures.

    8. The dean of students or a designee will present the charges and any written or physical evidence on behalf of the University. All witnesses shall testify in person. The board may address questions to any party or to any witness, but the student charged shall not be compelled to testify or answer any questions, and the student’s silence shall not be used against him/her. The board and/or student may request the production of records or other exhibits that are available to the University. The student shall have the right to respond to any evidence introduced on behalf of the University.

    9. If the accused student, after receiving appropriate notification of the date, time and place of a disciplinary hearing, fails or refuses to appear, the hearing will proceed.

    10. The University shall have the burden of proving that the student is guilty of the charged misconduct by a preponderance of the evidence.

    11. Final decisions of all hearing boards shall be by majority vote of the members present and voting.

    12. The hearing board shall submit a written report to the dean of students consisting of:

    (1) the notice of the charges and other hearing documents,

    (2) a summary of the evidence presented,

    (3) the findings of the board, and, if applicable, and

    (4) the sanction(s) recommended.

    13. The dean of students shall impose sanctions in light of the board's reccomendaton. The student shall be notified in writing of the findings of the hearing board and the proposed sanctions, which shall become effective unless the student makes a written appeal.

    D. Appeals Pending Imposition of Sanctions by the Dean of Students

    Either the student charged or the person who filed the charge may appeal a decision of a hearing board. Appeal requests must be made in writing to the dean of students within 14 calendar days of the mailing of the notice of findings of fact and proposed sanctions. Appeal requests, along with appropriate hearing documents, shall be promptly transmitted to the associate vice president for student affairs or a designee. If appealing to associate vice president for student affairs will create a conflict of interest, an unbiased person will be designated by the Dean of Students to hear the appeal.

    The findings of hearing boards may be reversed based upon any of the following:

    1. The decision was unsupported by substantial evidence in the view of the entire record;

    2. There was a substantial departure from, or denial of, rights or provisions enumerated under the Specifications of Fairness in Student Disciplinary Hearings provision or the Procedures for Hearing Boards provision of these policies and procedures.

    3. There is new evidence previously unavailable which, if proven accurate, could substantially alter the decision as to the guilt or innocence of the student charged or to the sanction imposed.

    4. There is a reasonable claim that the sanction imposed is disproportionate to the gravity of the conduct.

    The student charged and the person who filed the charge will be notified in writing of the decision concerning the results of the appeal.

  • Role of the Office of Community Life and the Dean of Students

    The Office of Community Life and the Dean of Students shall have the following responsibilities for directing efforts of students and staff members in matters involving student judicial affairs:

    1. receiving complaints against students concerning their conduct

    2. determining the disciplinary charges to be filed pursuant to these policies and procedures

    3. collecting evidence pertinent to the charges filed against a student

    4. interviewing and advising parties involved in disciplinary proceedings regarding their rights and the procedures to be followed

    5. conducting disciplinary conferences to adjudicate cases of minor violations of this code where separation from the University is not in question and the student chooses to waive the right to a hearing before a hearing board

    6. engaging in substantive discussion with students about relevant ethical issues

    7. scheduling and coordinating hearings

    8. notifying the accused and all parties involved of the charges and scheduled hearings

    9. notifying the accused and the complainant in writing of the decision of the hearing body

    10. maintaining student disciplinary records

    11. referring appeal requests to the appropriate official

    12. imposing sanctions agreed upon in disciplinary conferences with students or recommended by hearing boards and

    13. training and advising all hearing board members.

     

Student Grievances and Procedures

The University of Baltimore encourages students who feel they have been inappropriately treated to raise their concerns directly with the other person or people involved at the earliest possible time. Many problems can be understood and solved through direct discussion. Attempting to do so early increases the chance that any differences will be addressed in a healthy and constructive manner.

If a problem cannot be resolved by the individuals involved, students may seek advice and assistance from the dean of students or from the Center for Negotiations and Conflict Management, which will provide mediation services to facilitate communication between the parties when appropriate.

When it is not possible to resolve matters directly between the parties, students may use University grievance procedures to seek review of complaints involving University faculty, administrators, and staff members, and to obtain a fair and timely resolution. Students may file a grievance with regard to University policies, academic grades, and decisions made by or practices of faculty, administrators, or staff members that the students allege to be unfair.

The grievance procedure is divided into two parts: academic grievances (including grade challenges and other academic grievances) and non-academic grievances (including discrimination complaints and other student grievances). Specific procedures for each type of grievance are outlined below.

  • Grading Challenges (Yale Gordon College of Arts and Sciences, Merrick School of Business, and the College of Public Affairs)

    Students have the right to a grade based on their actual course performance as compared to an articulated standard that is applied to all those taking a course. Each instructor must therefore be able to articulate a uniform, identifiable standard that is applied in calculating any part of a student’s course grade. That standard must relate to the course syllabus, academic instruction, and the assignments and materials that were provided to the class. Students may seek review of any grading that is alleged to be arbitrary and capricious. Consistent with University System of Maryland policy, “arbitrary and capricious” grading means:

    • The assignment of a grade on some basis other than performance in the course,
    • The assignment of a grade in a nonuniform fashion, that is, by applying different standards to this student or by applying the standards in a different way than that in which they were applied to other students in the same course, or
    • The assignment of a grade in a way that represents a substantial and unreasonable departure from the instructor’s articulated standards.

    All requests for a review of grades must be made within 60 days after the relevant course grades have been posted within the University of Baltimore grading system.

    Informal Process: A student who believes that an instructor treated him or her unfairly in grading will initially consult with the instructor informally to discuss the concern. The student should request this meeting in writing (written communications by e-mail are acceptable for this purpose) and should keep a copy of the request.

    Within 14 calendar days after receiving such a request, the instructor will consult with the student informally and discuss the student’s concerns. This informal consultation will ideally be held in person, but may also take place by telephone conference or through an e-mail conversation if necessary to accommodate both participants.

    At the consultation, the student will explain his or her concerns about the grade and reason for believing the grade to be unfair. The instructor will refer the student to the portion of this handbook that provides the standards and processes for grading challenges. The instructor will also explain the standard he or she uses for grading in the particular course and how the student’s grade was determined based on application of that standard. If the student and instructor are able to reach an agreement about how to address the student’s grading concern during or as a result of the informal consultation, the matter will be considered resolved.

    If a student requests a meeting but the instructor does not respond within 14 calendar days after the request, or if the instructor is unavailable to consult in person, by phone, or by e-mail within that period, the student may proceed with the formal appeals process described below.

    Formal Process: If the student’s grade concern has not been resolved through informal consultation with the instructor, the student may present the matter in writing to the division or department chair of the academic program in which the course was taught. The division or department chair will serve as the decision-maker for the grade challenge. If the division chair has a conflict of interest with regard to the appeal, the dean of the relevant school will designate an unbiased decision-maker.

    The student’s written submission will:

    • state that the consultation requirements of the informal process have been met or could not be met, as described above
    • state clearly the reasons or grounds for challenging the grade, particularly the manner in which the grade is alleged to be “arbitrary and capricious,” as defined above
    • contain a concise statement of the facts relevant to the challenge and
    • contain the resolution sought.

    Within 14 calendar days after receiving a written submission from a student challenging a grade, the decision-maker will meet jointly with the student, the instructor who gave the grade, and any other person who can be helpful to a determination. It is preferable that this meeting be conducted in person; it may also be conducted by conference call, however, upon the agreement of all those involved or if it is not possible to hold the meeting in person within the 14-calendar-day time period. At the meeting, the decision-maker will confirm the student’s reasons for raising the challenge and will request that the instructor explain the standard he or she uses for grading in the particular course and how the student’s grade was determined under that standard.

    If the instructor declines to meet and provide the information described above or fails for respond to the decision-maker’s request for a meeting, the decision-maker will presume that the grade was given in an arbitrary and capricious fashion.

    Within 14 calendar days after meeting with the student, the instructor, and any other appropriate person(s), the decision-maker will make a written decision on the student’s claim and provide that decision to each of the parties. The issue to be decided is whether the grade was given in an arbitrary and capricious fashion, as defined above. If so, the grade challenge should be upheld and the grade changed in a fair and equitable manner, as determined by the decision-maker. If not, the grade should remain in place.

    Appeal of grading challenges: Either the student or the instructor may appeal the decision on a grade challenge in writing within 14 calendar days of the written decision. The appeal will be submitted to the dean of the school in which the course was taught or that dean’s designee. If appealing to the dean or the dean’s designee will create a conflict of interest in the judgment of the provost, the provost will designate an unbiased person to hear the appeal.

    The written appeal will state:

    • why the person appealing contends that the decision is unsupported by substantial evidence in view of the entire record
    • that there was a substantial departure from or denial of rights or procedures provided to the person appealing by these student academic grievance policies and procedures, or
    • that there is new evidence, previously unavailable, which if proven accurate would substantially alter the decision on the matter.

    The person considering the appeal will:

    • provide a notice of the appeal to the parties involved;
    • request a response from the party who did not appeal;
    • review all materials related to the appeal; and
    • make a final and binding decision as to whether the grade was given in an arbitrary and capricious fashion;
    • provide a written notice of the decision that was made on the appeal to each of the parties within 14 calendar days following the submission of the written response.
  • Grading Challenges (School of Law)

    I. Grading Policy

    There are several different mechanisms for evaluating a student's work, including examinations, classroom participation, papers, and performance in a clinical or simulation course. For all of these, students have the right to a grade that is based on their actual course performance as compared to an articulated standard applied to all those taking the course. Grading, however, is not and cannot be an exact science. The rights under this policy, therefore, are limited to ensuring that students receive the faculty member's good faith evaluation of their work. Moreover, in order for the protection of anonymous grading to be meaningful, students do not have the right to negotiate with a faculty member for a higher grade once an examination has been graded.

    II. Grading Standards

    A. A professor shall have a written uniform, identifiable standard which shall be applied to all examination answers and other student work used to calculate any part of a student's grade in the course. This standard may, but need not, quantify the precise allocation of points used to calculate the grade. A written copy of this standard must be shown, upon request, to the students who were graded under that standard.

    B. Grading student work other than examinations, such as papers, performance in a clinical or simulation course, and classroom participation, requires far greater flexibility. Accordingly, the uniform, identifiable standard for such work may be much more general than for examinations.

    C. A professor must keep for one year, from the date grades are posted on My UB, some record from which he or she can inform the student of the manner in which the student was evaluated and graded in the course.

    III. Grounds for Challenging a Grade

    A. As provided by the policies of the University System of Maryland, the only recognized grounds for challenging a grade are:

    1. that a clerical error, such as arithmetic, recording, or actual failure to have read a substantial part of a student's answer, was committed by the faculty member or an administrator, or

    2. that the grade was awarded in an arbitrary or capricious manner.

    B. Arbitrary and capricious grading is defined as the assignment of a grade without any reasonable basis or on the basis of a standard other than that described in Section II. A.

    IV. Procedures for Challenging Grades

    A. Challenges to a law school grade must be initiated by the student by consultation (discussion of the grade) with the faculty member responsible for the grade, within sixty (60) days after the first day of classes of the next semester (spring semester for fall semester grades and fall semester for spring semester and summer session grades). If the grade is not published on my UB by the first day of classes of the next semester, then the deadline shall be extended until sixty (60) days after it is published.

    Such consultation shall include a meeting with the professor and a review by the student of the graded bluebook or paper along with any other written explanatory material made available by the faculty member, such as the written standard used in the grading process, or model answers.

    B. If the faculty member is not available for consultation within the sixty (60) day period set forth above, the Associate Dean for Academic Affairs may extend the period for challenging a grade for an additional reasonable period, or may permit the student to file the formal complaint without the consultation.

    C. The purpose of the consultation is for the faculty member to explain the basis of the student's grade. The faculty member is only permitted to change a grade due to clerical error. When submitting a change of grade form to change a student's grade on the basis of a clerical error, a faculty member shall identify with particularity on the change of grade form the exact nature of the clerical error. The faculty member is not permitted to change a grade on the basis of a revised view of the quality of the work.

    D. A student may meet with the Associate Dean for Student Affairs to discuss what constitutes appropriate grounds to challenge a grade. Such meetings are for advisory purposes only. Nothing said by the Associate Dean for Student Affairs should be taken as agreement that a challenge is valid, nor will it have any effect on the decision of the Associate Dean for Academic Affairs.

    E. After consultation or waiver of consultation by the Associate Dean for Academic Affairs, a student may present a formal written challenge to the grade to the Associate Dean for Academic Affairs. This challenge must be filed within twenty (20) calendar days after the consultation or the waiver, and must be on an official grade challenge form, available from the Associate Dean for Academic Affairs or the Associate Dean for Student Affairs.

    F. The student's written challenge shall state:

    1. that the student has complied with the consultation requirement of section IV. A

    2. facts which, if found to be true, would be sufficient to show the basis for the claim of clerical error or for the claim that the grade was awarded in an arbitrary or capricious manner, and

    3. the remedy or resolution sought.

    G.

    1. The Associate Dean for Academic Affairs shall dismiss the grade challenge for failure to state a prima facie case for any of the following reasons:

    • failure to allege timely compliance with procedural requirements,
    • failure to allege one of the allowable grounds for appeal under section III., or
    • failure to state sufficient facts for the associate dean to determine whether the student has stated a prima facie case for one of the allowable grounds.

    2. If the challenge is dismissed for failure to state a prima facie case, the student may file an amended challenge within ten (10) working days of receiving the notice of dismissal.

    H. The Associate Dean for Academic Affairs shall determine whether the student has complied with the above procedures and whether the student has stated a prima facie case, and, if so, meet with the student (or in the case of a group of students, a chosen representative of the group) and the faculty member. The Associate Dean may determine whether to meet with the student and faculty member together or separately. The Associate Dean may also conduct any necessary further investigation. The Associate Dean shall change a grade that is being challenged or award other appropriate relief, if he or she determines that the original grade is incorrect because of clerical error or was awarded in an arbitrary or capricious manner. At the request of the faculty member, the Associate Dean also has the discretion to decide whether to change a grade due to the discovery of an egregious error in grading, which, in the opinion of the faculty member, would amount to a constructive arbitrary and capricious grade if unchanged. Within twenty-five (25) working days from the receipt of the written challenge, the Associate Dean for Academic Affairs shall issue a written decision to the student(s) and faculty member. Prior to issuing a decision, the Associate Dean for Academic Affairs shall consult with the Dean and in that consultation the Dean shall review the entire record. The decision issued by the Associate Dean after that consultation shall be the final decision of the School of Law.

    V. Appeal

    A. The student or faculty member may appeal the decision of the Associate Dean to the Provost of the University of Baltimore in writing within ten (10) working days of receiving the written decision from the Associate Dean.

    B. The only basis for an appeal of a decision of the Associate Dean to the Provost shall be a clear error of substance or procedure by the Associate Dean. The basis for the appeal and the remedy sought must be clearly stated by the student or faculty member.

    C. The Provost, to the extent possible, shall rule on the appeal on the basis of the written pleadings and the written decision of the Associate Dean.

    D. The Provost shall render a binding, final decision on a grade challenge appeal within twenty (20) working days of receipt of an appeal.

    VI. Exclusivity of Procedure

    These rules state the only grounds and procedures for challenging a grade received in a course at the University of Baltimore School of Law. These rules implement the University of Baltimore Student Policies and Procedures for Grievances by students, are consistent with those grievance procedures, and are based upon student rights protected therein. These rules also implement and are consistent with University System of Maryland policies concerning grade appeals.

  • Other Academic Grievances

    Informal Process: A student who believes that a faculty member treated him or her unfairly in some respect other than in grading will initially consult with the faculty member informally to discuss the concern. The student should request this meeting in writing (written communications by e-mail are acceptable for this purpose) and should keep a copy of the request. All requests must be made within 14 calendar days of the incident that raised the student’s concern.

    Within 14 calendar days after receiving such a request, the faculty member will set up a time to consult with the student informally and discuss the student’s concerns. Although this consultation will ideally be held in person, it may also take place by telephone conference or through an e-mail conversation if necessary to accommodate both participants. If the consultation is held in person and if the parties agree, the Center for Negotiations and Conflict Management will provide a mediator to facilitate the discussion.

    If the student and faculty member are able to reach an agreement about how to address the student’s concern during or as a result of the informal consultation, the matter will be considered resolved.

    If a student requests a meeting but the faculty member does not respond within 14 calendar days after the request, or if the faculty member is unavailable to consult in person, by phone, or by e-mail within that period, the student may proceed with the formal appeals process described below.

    Formal Process: If the student’s concern has not been resolved through informal consultation with the faculty member, the student may present the matter in writing to the division or department chair for the academic program in which the course was taught, who serves as the decision-maker for the complaint. If the division or department chair has a conflict of interest with regard to the appeal, the dean of the relevant school will designate an unbiased decision-maker.

    The student’s written submission will:

    • state that the consultation requirements of the informal process have been met
    • state clearly the reasons or grounds for challenging his or her treatment as unfair
    • contain a concise statement of the facts relevant to the challenge, and
    • contain the resolution sought

    Within 14 calendar days after receiving a written submission from a student, the decision-maker will meet jointly with the student, the faculty member, and any other person who can be helpful to a determination. It is preferable that this meeting be conducted in person; it may also be conducted by conference call, however, upon the agreement of all those involved or if meeting in person within the time frame provided is impossible. At the meeting, the decision-maker will confirm the student’s reasons for raising the complaint and will request that the faculty member explain the situation as he or she sees it.

    Within 14 calendar days after meeting with the student, the faculty member, and any other appropriate person(s), the decision-maker will render a written decision on the student’s complaint and provide that decision to each of the parties.

    Appeal of Other Academic Grievances: Either the student or the faculty member may appeal the decision on an academic grievance, in writing, within 14 calendar days of the written decision. The appeal will be submitted to the dean of the school in which the course was taught or that dean’s designee. If appealing to the dean or the dean’s designee will create a conflict of interest, the provost will designate an unbiased person to hear the appeal.

    The person considering the appeal will:

    • provide a notice of the appeal to the parties involved
    • request a response from the party who did not appeal
    • review all materials related to the appeal, and
    • make a final and binding decision on the merits of the appeal or, if he or she is unable to make a decision, request that a hearing board be convened to hear the appeal and make a recommendation to him or her. In either case, a written notice of the decision made on the appeal shall be provided to each of the parties within 14 working days following the submission of the written response.
  • Nonacademic Grievances

    The University of Baltimore provides processes for consideration of two types of nonacademic student concerns: those relating to discrimination allegations and those relating to other allegations of unfair treatment.

    Discrimination

    Policies:

    Nondiscrimination: The commitment of the University of Baltimore to the most fundamental principles of academic freedom, equality of opportunity, and human dignity requires that treatment of students be based on individual abilities and qualifications and be free from invidious discrimination. The University of Baltimore is therefore actively committed to providing equal educational opportunity in all of its institutions and programs. All policies, programs, and activities of the University are and shall be in conformity with all pertinent federal and state laws on non-discrimination regarding race, color, religion, age, national origin, sex, and disability, including, but not limited to, Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, as amended, Title IX of the 1972 Education Amendments, Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, as amended, and the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (ADA).

    Sexual Harassment. The University of Baltimore reaffirms the principle that its students, faculty, and staff have a right to be free from sex discrimination in the form of sexual harassment by any member of the University community. Sexual harassment represents a failure in ethical behavior and will not be condoned. It subverts the mission of the University and threatens the careers, educational experience, and well being of students, faculty, and staff. Sexual harassment is particularly damaging when it exploits the educational dependence and trust between students and faculty. When the authority and power inherent in faculty relationships with students, whether overtly, implicitly, or through misinterpretation, are abused in this way, there is potentially great damage to individual students, to the person complained of, and to the educational climate of the University. Faculty members and other individuals in positions of authority should be sensitive to the questions about mutuality of consent that may be raised and to the conflicts of interests that are inherent in personal relationships where professional and educational relationships are also involved.

    For the purpose of this policy, sexual harassment is defined as unwelcome advances, requests for sexual favors, degrading comments or jokes related to one's gender, or other verbal or physical conduct of a sexual nature when:

    • submission to such conduct is made either explicitly or implicitly as a term or condition of an individual’s employment or status in a course, program, or activity;
    • submission to or rejection of such conduct is used as a basis for an employment or educational decision affecting an individual; or
    • such conduct has the purpose or effect of unreasonably interfering with an individual’s work or educational performance, or of creating an intimidating, hostile, or offensive environment for work or learning.

    Sexual orientation, gender identity or expression. Policies, programs, and activities of the University of Baltimore also are and shall be in compliance with the University System of Maryland policy of non-discrimination on the basis of sexual orientation. Consistent with that policy, the University of Baltimore prohibits discrimination against students, faculty and staff on the basis of sexual orientation in academic admissions, financial aid, educational services, housing, student programs and activities, recruitment, hiring, employment, appointment, promotion, tenure, demotion, transfer, layoff or termination, rates of pay, selection for training and professional development, and employee services. "Sexual orientation" is defined as the identification, perception, or status of an individual as to homosexuality, heterosexuality, or bisexuality. The Board of Regents reserves the right to observe the terms of any bona fide employee benefit plan such as retirement, pension, or insurance plan, and to enforce or comply with any federal or state law, regulation, or guideline, including conditions for the receipt of federal funding. In addition, the University of Baltimore will not discriminate on the basis of gender identity or expression (that is, those who are transgender or who choose nontraditional forms of gender expression).

    Student Procedures:

    The University of Baltimore has adopted internal procedures to provide prompt and equitable resolution of discrimination complaints involving students. Discrimination complaints covered under this procedure are those that allege actions related to students’ education that are prohibited by state and federal anti-discrimination laws and/or University System of Maryland policy and where the allegedly discriminatory actions involved a student as one of the parties. Students’ rights to a prompt and equitable resolution of complaints made under the University’s procedure will not be affected if they also choose to pursue other legal remedies, including those initiated by filing a complaint with the responsible federal department or agency. Students are encouraged to use this procedure before pursuing other remedies, but they are not required to do so. The rules governing this procedure are intended to encourage the early and constructive consideration of discrimination concerns while at the same time protecting the substantive rights of interested persons, meeting appropriate due process standards, and assuring that the University of Baltimore complies with applicable state and federal regulations.

    Note: Under U.S. Department of Education regulations, the University of Baltimore need not process discrimination complaints from applicants for admission; under the University System of Maryland policy on sexual orientation, however, applicants for admission may file internal claims alleging discrimination in admission on the basis of sexual orientation.

    Informal process for discrimination claims

    A student who believes that he or she has been treated unfairly due to his or her race, race, color, religion, national origin, sex, age, disability, or sexual orientation, or who believes that he or she has been sexually harassed, has three informal options available for addressing the situation:

    1. The student may consult with the other person(s) involved when the concern arises and attempt to resolve the issue informally.

    2. If the student and the other person(s) involved agree, the Center for Negotiations and Conflict Management will provide a mediator or mediators to facilitate a discussion between them.

    3. The student may bring his or her concern to any member of the faculty or administration of the University for advice and assistance concerning options for addressing the concern. For example, the person to whom the concern is brought may help the student resolve the matter informally; help the student draft a formal complaint; and/or direct the student to those who can provide additional assistance.

    The person from whom advice and assistance is sought must treat the complaint as confidential and may not discuss it with anyone without the student’s consent. In particular, the advisor may not inform the person accused of discriminatory behavior of the student’s concern without the student’s consent.

    Internal discrimination complaints

    If the parties are unable to resolve the issue informally or if any party is unwilling to participate in informal resolution processes, students may address to the dean of students complaints of discrimination on the basis of race, color, religion, national origin, sex, age, disability, or sexual orientation; of violations of Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 or the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA); and of sexual harassment.

    A complaint under this internal procedure should be filed in writing, contain the name and address of the person filing it, and briefly describe the alleged violation of the applicable laws, regulations, or policies, including;

    • when and where the alleged conduct occurred
    • the name(s) of the person(s) alleged to have violated the policy;
    • the names of any witnesses to the violation; and
    • the relief requested.

    Any complaint should be filed within 14 calendar days after the student becomes aware of the claimed violation. Upon receiving the complaint, the dean of students shall give a copy to any person(s) alleged to have violated any of the laws, regulations or policies.

    The dean of students or her designee will investigate the complaint. These rules contemplate informal but thorough investigations, affording all interested persons an opportunity to submit relevant evidence and including a discussion with the complainant, with the person(s) alleged to have violated the policy and with any witnesses.

    As part of the investigation, the dean of students may negotiate a resolution of the complaint or encourage the parties to participate in mediation with a mediator provided by the Center for Negotiations and Conflict Management for the purpose of reaching a voluntary resolution.

    If the complaint is not resolved voluntarily by the parties, the dean of students will mail a written determination to the complainant and to the respondent(s) within 21 calendar days of the filing of a complaint, stating one of the following:

    1. There is no reasonable cause to believe a violation of University policy has occurred and therefore the internal complaint will be dismissed.

    2. There is reasonable cause to believe there may have been a violation of law or policy.

    (a)Upon making a determination of reasonable cause with regard to a complaint alleging discriminatory acts committed by a student, the dean of students will recommend a remedy or sanction and will provide the parties an additional opportunity to resolve the matter. If the parties do not agree to resolve the matter, it will be referred to a hearing board for a hearing and decision. A hearing should be held within 21 calendar days of the dean of students' determination. The hearing will follow the normal procedures applicable to hearing boards under these policies and procedures.

    (b) Upon making a determination of reasonable cause with regard to a complaint alleging discriminatory acts committed by a member of the faculty, administration, or staff of the University, the dean of students will refer the complaint to the Office of Human Resources for further action.

    The dean of students will also maintain the files and records of the University of Baltimore relating to all discrimination complaints filed.

    In the event that the dean of students has a conflict of interest with regard to a particular complaint, the dean of the school in which the complaining student is enrolled will perform all functions assigned to the dean of students with regard to that complaint, except that the dean of students will maintain the files and records of that complaint once the process has been completed.

    Appeal

    A complainant may appeal a determination of no reasonable cause made by the dean of students and either party may appeal the decision of a hearing board. A party wishing to appeal must submit a written request to the provost within 14 calendar days after the receipt of the determination or decision appealed. The request must include an explanation of the basis for the complainant’s dissatisfaction with the determination or decision from which the appeal has been made.

    The provost will decide on an appeal after reviewing the full record relevant to the grievance, including the hearing record if a hearing has been held. If appealing to the provost will create a conflict of interest, the president of the University will designate an unbiased person to hear the appeal. The provost or the president’s designee will make a written decision on appeal within 14 calendar days of the filing of the appeal and will provide it to all parties. That decision will be the final outcome of the internal procedure.

    An appeal will be granted when:

    1. the decision is unsupported by substantial evidence on the record;

    2. there is a substantial departure from or denial of rights or procedures provided for the grievance process or the use of Hearing Boards in these policies and procedures;

    3. there is new evidence, previously unavailable, which, if proven accurate, would substantially alter the decision or the sanction or remedy imposed;

    4. there is a reasonable claim that the sanction or remedy imposed is disproportionate to the gravity of the conduct.

    Other Nonacademic Grievances

    Informal Process: A student who believes that a member of the faculty, administration, or staff treated him or her unfairly in a way that is unrelated to discrimination and nonacademic in nature will initially consult informally with the person involved to discuss the concern. The student should request this meeting in writing (written communications by e-mail are acceptable for this purpose) and should keep a copy of the request. All requests must be made within 14 calendar days after the student becomes aware of the allegedly unfair treatment.

    up a time to consult with the student informally and discuss the student’s concerns. Although this consultation will ideally be held in person, it may also take place by telephone conference or through an e-mail conversation if necessary to accommodate both participants. If the consultation is held in person and if the parties agree, the Center for Negotiations and Conflict Management will provide a mediator or mediators to facilitate the discussion.

    If the student and the faculty, administration or staff member are able to reach an agreement about how to address the student’s concern during or as a result of the informal consultation, the matter will be considered resolved.

    If a student requests a meeting but the faculty, administration or staff member involved does not respond within 14 calendar days after the request, or is unavailable to consult in person, by phone, or by e-mail within that period, the student may proceed with the formal process described below.

    Formal Process: If the student’s concern has not been resolved through informal consultation with the faculty, administration, or staff member, the student may present the matter in writing to the dean of students, who serves as the decision-maker for the complaint. The student’s written submission will:

    • state that the consultation requirements of the informal process have been met or could not be met;
    • contain a concise statement of the facts relevant to the complaint; and
    • contain the resolution sought.

    Within 14 working days after receiving a written submission from a student, the dean of students will meet jointly with the student, the faculty member, and any other person who can be helpful to a determination. It is preferable that this meeting be conducted in person; it may also be conducted by conference call, however, upon the agreement of all those involved or if it is impossible to hold a face-to-face meeting during the 14-day time period. At the meeting, the dean of students will confirm the student’s reasons for raising the complaint and will request that the faculty, staff, or administration member involved explain the situation as he or she sees it.

    Within 14 calendar days after meeting with the student, the faculty, administration or staff member, and any other appropriate person(s), the dean of students will render a written decision on the student’s complaint and provide that decision to each of the parties.

    Appeal of Other Nonacademic Grievances: Either the student or the faculty member may appeal the decision on a non-academic grievance in writing within 14 calendar days of the written decision. The appeal will be submitted to the provost. If appealing to the provost will create a conflict of interest, the president of the University will designate an unbiased person who is qualified to hear the appeal in the president’s judgment.

    The provost or the president’s designee will:

    • provide a notice of the appeal to the parties involved;
    • request a response from the party who did not appeal, to be provided within seven calendar days of the request;
    • review all materials related to the appeal; and
    • make a final and binding written decision on the merits of the appeal and provide it to each of the parties within 14 calendar days following the submission of the written response.

General Policy Statements

  • Nondiscrimination Statement

    The University of Baltimore does not discriminate on the basis of race, religion, age, color, national origin, sex, sexual orientation or disability in its programs, activities, or employment practices. Inquiries regarding discrimination related to educational programs and activities should be directed to the office of student affairs, 410 837-4755. Inquiries regarding employment discrimination should be directed to the affirmative action officer at the University of Baltimore, 410-837-5410.

  • Accessibility Policy

    The University of Baltimore is committed to providing barrier-free education to disabled students and is actively working to bring its facilities and programs into full compliance with § 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 as amended. It is the policy of the University to reassign classes to accessible buildings whenever necessary to provide adequate access to the class for a disabled student.

  • Canceled Classes

    In general, the University will not close unless weather conditions make this action absolutely necessary. Decisions for morning closings will be made by 6:30 a.m. Decisions affecting evening classes will be made by 4:00 p.m. Closing announcements can be heard on the following radio/television stations:

    WBAL/WIYY (1100 AM/98 FM)

    WFBR/WLIF (1300 AM/102 FM)

    WJZ-TV (CH 13)

    WCAO (600 AM)

    WCBM (680 AM)

    WBSB (B104 FM)

    WITH (1230 AM)

    WQSR (105.7 FM)

    WFSI (107.9 FM) Annapolis

    WNAV/WHFS (1430 AM/99.1 FM) Annapolis

    WTOP (1500 AM) Washington

    You may also call the University weather line at 410-837-4201 to learn the status of classes and the closing of the University.

  • Disabilities Documentation Policy

    It is the policy of the University of Baltimore to provide reasonable accommodations for students with disabilities. In order to provide academic adjustments, proper documentation is required and must be presented to the director of disability support services (for liberal arts and business students) or to the associate dean for student affairs (law school). Students with sensory (visual, hearing), physical (mobility) or other health impairments (epilepsy, AIDS) are required to provide medical reports or a letter from a physician responsible for treating the student. This documentation must be provided whether the condition is permanent or temporary (broken leg, etc.).

    Students with learning disabilities (LD) must provide current documentation (prepared within the past three years) of their LD diagnosis. Results of assessments conducted prior to college are deemed inadequate. This documentation will be reviewed by the Center for Educational Access for all undergraduate and graduate students and by the associate dean for student affairs for law students. Documentation for LD students must be prepared by a professional qualified to diagnose a learning disability, including but not limited to a licensed psychiatrist, learning disability specialist, or psychologist. Documentation from a licensed clinical social worker will not be considered as the sole criterion for providing services. Documentation for a learning disability must include the testing procedures followed, the instruments used to assess the disability, the test results and an interpretation of the test results.

    Documentation relating to all undergraduates and graduates in the Yale Gordon College of Arts and Science, the College of Public Affairs, and the Merrick School of Business will be retained in the Center for Educational Access; documentation relating to law students will be retained in the office of the associate dean for student affairs. Documentation will remain in these offices for the duration of the student’s academic career and will be kept confidential. Upon graduation, documentation will be destroyed unless the student requests that it be returned to him or her.

  • Destructive Groups

    Clubs and organizations are an important social and educational component to the life of a student at the University of Baltimore and all students are encouraged to participate to the extent that their schedule allows. On occasion, however, a group may choose to use less than positive means to recruit, motivate, and retain its members. Should students feel that a University club or organization is not appropriately recruiting or retaining members, they should contact the Office of Student Affairs.

  • Policies on Drug and Alcohol Use

    General Policy Statement

    The use or abuse of controlled or illegal substances, and alcohol, pose s a serious threat to the health and welfare of a large segment of the college student population through a lessening of academic performance, estrangement of social relations, creation of mental health and physiological problems, vandalism, and in some cases bodily injury, illness, and death.

    The University of Baltimore drug and alcohol policies are designed to help protect the health and welfare of students, observe state, federal and local laws and maintain an atmosphere and environment appropriate for learning.

    Health Risks

    Substance abuse is recognized as the number one public health problem in the United States accounting for about 150,000 deaths annually. This includes deaths from stroke, disease of the heart and liver, and all alcohol and drug related suicides, homicides and accidents. About 30 percent of all those admitted to general hospitals and 50 percent to psychiatric hospitals have detectable substance abuse.

    Treatment/Referral

    Persons interested in discussing drug or alcohol related problems are encouraged to contact the University of Baltimore Counseling Center (UBCC) for either counseling or referral services. They are located in room 111 of the Academic Center, 410.837.5159, counseling@ubalt.edu, www.ubalt.edu/counseling. Besides offering crisis intervention and short-term counseling, the UBCC makes an up-to-date resource directory available. Resources in the directory include a broad range of treatment modalities and support groups. As with any type of health care, confidentiality is always maintained. Additional help can also be foundby contacting the:

    Addiction Helpline

    1.800.559.9503

    Alcohol & Drug Abuse Administration

    www.maryland-adaa.org

    Baltimore County Substance Abuse Program

    410.789.2647

    Drug Policy

    The University of Baltimore is committed to using all availablemeans to prevent illegal activities on campus. Use, possession, sale, distribution, and being under the influence of controlled substances or illegal substances on University premises or at University-organized activities is strictly prohibited, except as permitted by law.

    Violations

    Violations of laws and university policies and regulations regarding the use of controlled/illegal substances and alcohol at on-campus or University-organized activities off-campus aresubject to prosecution through both law enforcement authorities and the campus judicial system. Penalties through the latter authority will depend on a careful review of the facts andcircumstances of each individual case, but will take into consideration such factors as the accused person’s previous record, the nature of the substance, and the degree of culpability. The range of university penalties shall include, but not be limited to, disciplinary reprimand, loss of privilege, restitution, disciplinary probation, disciplinary suspension, disciplinary dismissal, and disciplinary expulsion.

    Legal Sanctions

    Students and employees at the University of Baltimore are subject to federal, state and local laws regarding the possession and distribution of illegal drugs. Federal Law 21 USCA, sections 841 and 844, states that it is unlawful to possess, manufacture, distribute or dispense a controlled substance.  In addition, the state of Maryland has additionallaws dealing with distribution, manufacturing, and possession of controlled substances. Maryland law (Sections 5-601, 5-602 and 5-607, Criminal Law Article) states that any persons who unlawfully manufacture, distribute, dispense or possess a controlled dangerous substance may be subject to imprisonment up to 5 years and fines up to $25,000. Maryland. Ann. Code Art. 27, section 286 (1989), further states that any person who unlawfully manufactures or distributes any controlled dangerous substances may be fined up to $25,000 and may be imprisoned for up to 20 years for a first offense.

    Federal law 21 USC, sections 841 and 844–845a (1990), states that it is unlawful to possess any controlled substance for any illegal purpose. If the substance is cocaine, or contains a cocaine base, the penalty for simple possession is a fine and/or imprisonment from 5 to 20 years. For other illegal drugs, the penalty for simple possession is a fine of at least $1,000 and/or imprisonment for up to 3 years. The penalties increase if the possession includes intent to manufacture, distribute, or dispense a controlled substance, especially if done so near a public or private elementary, vocational, or secondary school, or a public or private college or university. Additionally, any person who violates this law shall also be liable to the United States for an amount up to $10,000 in civil penalties.

    Convictions related to controlled and/or illegal substances will adversely impact a student’s ability to receive federal financial aid.

    Also, in Baltimore City, under Article 19, section 58C of the City Code, it is illegal to loiter in a certified drug-free zone, with penalties of imprisonment of up to 30 days and a fine of up to $400.

     

     

    Alcohol Policy

    The University of Baltimore permits the use of alcoholic beverages in designated areas on campus if such use is in conformity with all applicable alcoholic beverage laws and the specific University regulations. The use of alcoholic beverages on campus or at off-campus University sponsored events must also be consistent with the maintenance of a high standard of conduct conducive to learning.

    Violations

    Violation of any regulation regarding alcoholic beverages will be adjudicated through the University’s judicial system, and where appropriate, through legal action. Students and organizations found to be in violation shall face a range of University sanctions as provided in the Code of Conduct, including but not be limited to, disciplinary reprimand, loss of privilege, restitution, disciplinary probation, disciplinary suspension, disciplinary dismissal, and disciplinary expulsion.

    Legal Sanctions

    Students and employees of the University of Baltimore are subject to state laws for possessing, consuming and obtaining alcohol.  It is illegal in the state of Maryland for any person under 21 to falsify or misrepresent his or her age to obtain alcohol or to possess alcoholic beverages with the intent to consume them. It is also illegal in most situations to furnish alcohol to a person under 21 or to obtain alcohol on behalf of a person under 21. The penalty is a fine of up to $500 for a first offense and up to $1,000 for repeat offenses. Under section TR16-113 of the Maryland Annotated Code, licensees under the age of 21 years are prohibited from driving or attempting to drive a motor vehicle while having alcohol in the licensee's blood. Violation of this license restriction may result in a license suspension or revocation and/or a fine.

    All sales, distribution, and consumption of alcoholic beverages, must conform to regulations of the University as set forth herein, to the regulations of the Board of Liquor License Commissioners for Baltimore City, and the laws of the state of Maryland. Specifically, Article 2B of the Annotated Code of Maryland (Alcoholic Beverages Law):

    1. Prohibits selling or permitting consumption of alcoholic beverages after the prescribed hours (Section 86);

    2. Prohibits permitting any person to drink any alcoholic beverage not purchased from the license holder on the premises covered by the license and not permitted by the license to be consumed on the premises (Section 114);

    3. Prohibits selling or furnishing any alcoholic beverages to a minor or a person visibly under the influence of any alcoholic beverage (Section 18). The City of Baltimore Liquor Board requires that a one-day liquor license be obtained and displayed at any event where beer and wine are sold. Information about the acquisition of permits is available from the Center for Student Involvement.

    Regulations for the Marketing, Sale, Distribution, and Consumption of Alcoholic Beverages at University Events

    All state, federal and local laws must be observed when marketing, selling and consuming alcoholic beverages.

    Designated Areas

    Alcoholic beverages may only be served and consumed in areas designated and approved by the Office of Auxiliary Services. When sold by student groups, alcoholic beverages must be approved and ordered through the Center for Student Involvement ten days prior to the event.

    Precautionary Measures

    Individuals or organizations sponsoring events on or off-campus are toimplement precautionary measures to ensure that alcoholic beverages are not abused, accessible, or served to persons under the legal drinking age (21) or to persons who appear intoxicated. Such measures shall include but not be limited to: identification and age verification checks, wristbands or hand stamps identifyingthose eligible to drink alcoholic beverages, having designated servers distribute all alcoholic beverages, prohibiting any form of drinking ”contest” or game, restricting distribution of free and inexpensive alcoholic beverages, informing and arranging for UB police to be on call for all events, and having nonalcoholic beverages and food available where alcoholic beverages are served.

    Advertising/Promotion

    Promotional materials including advertisement of University events may not:

    1. Make reference to the amount and price of alcoholic beverages (such as the number of beer kegs available),

    2. Encourage any form of alcohol abuse,

    3. Place emphasis on quantity and frequency of use,

    4. Associate alcohol consumption with the performance of tasks that require skilled reactions such as the operation of motor vehicles or machinery, or

    5. Portray drinking as a solution to personal or academic problems of students or as necessary to social, sexual, or academic success. All promotional materials shall note the availability of non-alcoholic beverages as prominently as alcohol. Alcoholic beverages may not be used as inducement to participate in a university/student organization sponsored event. Display or availability of promotional material for both on-campus and off-campus events shall be determined in consultation with the Director for the Center for Student Involvements or his/her designee.

    Campus Marketing Programs

    Campus marketing programs which include controlled sampling are permitted but shall conform to all University alcohol regulations, including the availability of alternative nonalcoholic beverages and food. No uncontrolled sampling as part of a campus event is permitted. The consumption of alcoholic beverages shall not be the sole purpose of any promotional activity. Marketing programs should have educational value and subscribe to the philosophy of responsible and legal use of the products represented. Marketers shall support campus alcohol awareness programs that encourage informed and responsible decisions about the use or nonuse of alcoholic beverages.

    Free Alcoholic Beverages

    Alcoholic beverages may not be provided as promotions, free awards or prizes to individual students or campus organizations. Free alcoholic beverages may not be served at student events without prior approval from the Director for the Center for Student Involvement or his/her designee.

     

    Last Update: September 18, 2013

     

  • Elevators

    The elevators at the University are for general use, but disabled persons have priority in their use.

  • Emergency Measures

    In the event that an illness or an accident requiring first aid treatment occurs in the classroom or on University property at any time, notify a public safety officer.

  • Grades

    University policy forbids the public display of individual student grades in any form, including the use of the telephone and e-mail to inform students of their grades. At the option of the instructor, arrangements may be made to inform students of particular course grades by personal mail or through the Gradebook feature of Sakai/WebTycho course sites only. Students may use My UB to access their final semester grades.

  • Hazing Policy

    Hazing is prohibited at the University of Baltimore. When this policy is violated, the University may take action against all participants through its disciplinary procedures.

    Hazing is defined as any action taken or situation created by students within a University group or organization that intentionally produces mental or physical discomfort, embarrassment, harassment, or ridicule for other students seeking to join or maintain membership in that group or organization.

  • I.D. Cards

    The University of Baltimore Campus Card (known as the Bee Card) is issued to all students by the Office of Campus Card Operations, which is located in Academic Center,Room 105.  Students must be fully enrolled in their semester classes twenty-four hours prior to obtaining their card. The Bee Card is essential as it not only acts as your student I.D. but is also needed to access materials from the libraries, utilize the campus recreation facilities, admission to University events, and much more. The card must be carried at all times while on University property. On weekends and holidays, when the University is not open for official business, students must present their Bee Card and sign the visitors’ log to enter University buildings. A lost Bee Card should be reported to the Office Campus Card Operations. A replacement card can be issued for $20. For more information please visit www.ubalt.edu/beecard.

  • Privacy Act

    The University complies with the requirements of both the Federal Education and Privacy Act of (FERPA), 34 CFR Part99, and the Maryland Public Information Act, State Governemnt Article 10-162.

    In compliance with these acts, the university will only release without your signature that information that is so designated as directory information. Directory information is defined as-the student's name, hometown, major field of study, participation in officially recognized activities and sports, dates of attendance, degrees and awards received, the most recent previous educational agency or institution attended by the student, and other similar information. The Maryland Public Information Act requires the university to provide directories of its students upon request. Consequently, directories may be released to commercial enterprises, such as credit card companies. If you do not wish to have directory information released, you are required to submit that request by filing a "Request to Withhold Directory Information" form in the Office of Records and Transcripts, prior to the start of each semester. FERPA provides students with the opportunity to review information contained in their "educational records." Offices where students' educational records are kept: Records and Transcripts, and in some cases as applicable Financial Aid, Veterans Affairs, Undergraduate and Graduate Admissions, Law Admissions, and the academic deans. Students who wish to review their records may do so my making an appointment with the appropriate head of the office housing the record.

  • Rape and Sexual Offenses Policy

    The University System of Maryland policy on sexual assault is on file in the office of the dean of students and is applied at the University of Baltimore.

    • Policy

      The University System of Maryland and its constituent institutions adopt this policy on sexual assault, consistent with the requirements of (i) Section 484(f) of the Higher Education Act of 1965, as amended by Section 486 (c) (2) of the Higher Education Amendments of 1992, and (ii) Section 11-601 of the Education Article of the Annotated Code of Maryland. This policy applies to all students and employees, both faculty and non-faculty, of the University System of Maryland or its constituent institutions.

    • Definitions

      The following policy recognizes two levels of sexual assault.

      Sexual Assault I
      By stranger or acquaintance, rape, forcible sodomy or forcible sexual penetration, however slight, of another person’s anal or genital opening with any object. These acts must be committed either by force, threat, intimidation or through the use of the victim’s mental or physical helplessness of which the accused was aware or should have been aware.

      Sexual Assault II
      By stranger or acquaintance, the touch of any unwilling person’s intimate part (defined as genitalia, groin, breast, or buttocks or clothing covering them) or forcing an unwilling person to touch another’s intimate parts. These acts must be committed either by force, threat, intimidation or through the use of the victim’s mental or physical helplessness of which the accused was aware or should have been aware.

    • Reporting Procedure

      Victims are encouraged to report any sexual assault, rape or any sexual offense/contact, either forcible or non forcible, to the Campus Police, University Counseling Services or the Human Resources Office, who are trained and willing to assist the victim in contacting medical and/or law enforcement professionals.

      Victims of sexual assault are urged to contact law enforcement or medical personnel as soon as possible following the occurrence to receive guidance in the preservation of evidence needed for proof of criminal assaults and the apprehension and prosecution of assailants. Through its concurrent Jurisdiction and Mutual Aid Agreement with the Baltimore City Police Department, the Campus Police have access to the Baltimore City Police crime lab and other investigating units upon request.

    • Victims’ Services

      Victims of sexual assault have access to counseling through a University-associated psychotherapist or referral to nearby community resources. After a sexual assault has been reported, and upon the request of the alleged victim, the victim shall be offered an alternative academic or employment situation if such an alternative is available, feasible, and appropriate to the facts of the reported assault.

    • Student Disciplinary Procedures

      Violations of law and University policies and regulations regarding rape or sexual offenses will be subject to prosecution by law enforcement authorities and through the campus judicial system when they occur on University premises or at University-organized activities. The range of University penalties shall include, but is not limited to one or more of the following: alteration of class schedule, disciplinary reprimand, loss of privilege, restitution, disciplinary probation, disciplinary suspension, disciplinary dismissal, and disciplinary expulsion.

      The University procedures guarantee that:

      • the accuser and the accused are entitled to the same opportunities to have others present during a campus disciplinary proceeding;
      • both the accuser and accused are informed of the outcome of any campus disciplinary proceeding brought alleging a sexual assault;
      • the accuser and the accused will be treated with dignity, courtesy, and professionalism; and
      • while the offense must be reported according to federal reporting mandates and Maryland law, the victim’s right to choose whether to proceed with the University disciplinary process will be upheld to the extent possible.
    • Rape and Sexual Offense Awareness — Educational and Counseling Programs

      Educational programs for the awareness and prevention of sexual offenses and counseling services for the victims/survivors of sexual assaults are provided through the University counseling office. The counseling office can also provide off-campus referrals for counseling and other support services.

      The Campus Police offer a Rape Aggression Defense program (RAD) to female employees and students, taught by a University police officer who is certified as a RAD instructor.

      Persons wishing more information are encouraged to contact University Counseling Services, the Campus Police, the Office of Student Affairs, and/or the Human Resources Office.

  • Smoking Policy

    Smoking can be hazardous to health for smokers and non-smokers alike. It can contribute to heart attack, stroke, high blood pressure, emphysema, and several forms of cancer. The University of Baltimore has taken positive steps toward providing for all employees and students a smoke-free environment in which smoking is prohibited within all University buildings. This no-smoking policy stresses compliance on the part of employees and students. While it is best to rely on common courtesy for colleagues and classmates to ensure the success of this policy, the University is prepared to enforce it with formal sanctions. Visitors who refuse to comply with this policy will be required to leave University premises.

  • Parking and Traffic Regulations

    Parking and traffic regulations are formulated and enforced through the Office of Parking Services and the Department of Public Safety, which publish periodic revisions of regulations. Copies of these regulations are available in these offices and the Business Office. Students are responsible for familiarizing themselves with these regulations and abiding by them. Violations of these regulations may result in disciplinary procedures as described herein.

  • Official Campus Regulations

    UB requires use of the ubalt.edu e-mail account in all official University administrative and academic communications in order to:

    • Streamline campus communications
    • Increase security of University e-mails
    • Ensure that official University announcements are sent to active e-mail accounts
    • Enhance the student experience by maintaining a standard e-mail protocol and directory throughout the University.

      You may choose to redirect your University e-mail to an outside, personal account; please see the instructions on how to forward your ubalt.edu mail provided by the Office of Technology Services. Individuals who select this option assume full responsibility for maintaining their private accounts and remain accountable for any official University communication sent to the ubalt.edu address.

      It is important to check the ubalt.edu account on a regular basis, as e-mails constitute an official means of communication regarding University policies, deadlines and other important student information.

      Please contact the OTS Call Center, x 6262, with any questions or for further assistance.