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Yale Gordon College of Arts and Sciences

Write Brain Kids

Write Brain Kids program

Write Brain Kids

Write Brain Kids, Govans Elementary, fall 2012

Write Brain Kids

Write Brain Kids, Govans Elementary, fall 2012

Write Brain Kids

Write Brain Kids, Govans Elementary, fall 2012

Write Brain Kids

Write Brain Kids, Govans Elementary, fall 2012

Write Brain Kids

Write Brain Kids, Govans Elementary, fall 2012

Write Brain Kids

Write Brain Kids, Govans Elementary, fall 2012

Write Brain Kids

Write Brain Kids, Govans Elementary, fall 2012

Write Brain Kids

Write Brain Kids, Govans Elementary, fall 2012

Write Brain Kids

Write Brain Kids, Govans Elementary, fall 2012

Write Brain Kids

Write Brain Kids, Govans Elementary, fall 2012

Write Brain Kids

Write Brain Kids, Govans Elementary, fall 2012

Write Brain Kids

Write Brain Kids, Govans Elementary, fall 2012

Write Brain Kids: bringing the magic of reading and writing into the elementary classroom.


Featured in the video above is Christine Lincoln, M.F.A. '11, who read from her work to the fifth-grade class at Govans Elementary through the Write Brain Kids program.

Lincoln is the author of Sap Rising , a novel written in stories that has received international acclaim. Her stories have appeared on stage at Symphony Space and Word Theatre and have been read and performed by Don Cheadle, Gary Douran and Lizan Mitchell.

Lincoln is currently at work on a collection of stories, A Thousand Hills.

The Write Brain Kids program—a program in residence at the Klein Family School of Communications Design—brings literature to life for students at Govans Elementary School, in north Baltimore, through weekly reading-aloud sessions and creative writing activities.

Co-creators Jane Delury , assistant professor, and Christine Grillo and Elissa Weissman, both adjunct faculty, have developed a yearlong curriculum to encourage ongoing habits of reading and writing. Among the program's intended outcomes are excitement about books and confidence in writing. Local authors make special in-class visits to read to the fourth- and fifth-grade students from their own works.

It was an amazing transformation; to watch those students who were at first dubious at best on the subject and in the practice of creative writing come around to seeing it as a way for them to express their ideas, to communicate their hopes and dreams, was really something special!
Carlajean Valuzzi

In fall 2012, two UB students—Carlajean Valuzzi, an M.F.A. in Creative Writing & Publishing Arts student, and undergrad Amanda Grant—are teaching fourth-graders, while M.F.A. candidate Drew Robison is chronicling and supporting the program through publishing projects. All three students meet with Write Brain Kids administrators regularly and maintain a wiki that will be used to enhance the curricula and help train future student-teachers.

Whoever said American children don't like to read haven't met our students. I believe that if they could have gotten away with it they would have stolen our copies to finish the book faster! How great is it to say, 'All right, that's it for this week,' and be met with a resounding 'AW man! C'mon, one more chapter! Please!'"?
Amanda Grant

Delury, Grillo and Weissman teach in the fifth-grade classroom, honing the skills and deepening the creative thinking emphasized in the fourth-grade program.

For more information about the program, contact Jane Delury.